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Rick Santorum Is Out Of Touch With Americans On Contraception

February 17, 2012

Way out of touch!

There is no way to rationalize why contraception seems like a good idea for Republicans to embrace in a culture war that only stimulates the far right-wing conservatives while alarming every woman in the nation.

Women, by the way, vote in larger numbers than men.

— Santorum: Says he wouldn’t try to take away the pill or condoms. But he believes states should be free to ban them if they want. He argues that the Supreme Court erred when it ruled in 1965 that married Americans have a right to privacy that includes the use of contraceptives.

Birth control, even within marriage, violates his beliefs as a Roman Catholic. Last year Santorum told the Christian blog Caffeinated Thoughts that as president he would warn the nation about “the dangers of contraception” and the permissive culture it encourages. “Many of Christian faith have said, ‘Well, that’s OK. Contraception is OK,’” he said. “It’s not OK. It’s a license to do things in the sexual realm that is counter to how things are supposed to be. … If it’s not for purposes of procreation, then you diminish this very special bond between men and women.”

On Friday Santorum told “CBS This Morning” that as a senator he supported federal money for birth control services but he also wants to promote abstinence “as a healthier alternative.”

— Catholics: Despite the church’s teachings, 84 percent of U.S. Catholics believe a person who uses artificial birth control can still be a good Catholic, according to a CBS News poll. And 89 percent of Catholic women favor expanding access to birth control for those who can’t afford it, the nonpartisan Public Religion Research Institute found.

— All Americans: Almost all say contraception is OK. Three-fourths of U.S. women have taken the pill, the CBS News poll says, and other studies show nearly all sexually active women have used some type of birth control.  A mere 8 percent of Americans think birth control is morally wrong, according to a Pew Research Center poll this month. Four in 10 say it’s not even a moral issue these days.

4 Comments
  1. Laurie G permalink
    February 17, 2012 8:55 PM

    Dale’s observation is probably what most of the GOP male policatians feel comfortable with, but I think they need to talk to their spouses. Woman who are in menopause also use these hormone treatments (birth control) to control the syptoms and effects of menopause. These men need to have some honest discussions with their wifes about what hormones do for women, beside birth control.

  2. February 17, 2012 8:29 PM

    Dale,

    Excellent comment and I think you have struck upon a very good summary of that aspect of the issue.

  3. February 17, 2012 6:56 PM

    You wrote: There is no way to rationalize why contraception seems like a good idea for Republicans to embrace in a culture war that only stimulates the far right-wing conservatives while alarming every woman in the nation.

    Perhaps it is not obvious. There are people who believe that life is patriarchal. That Man is superior to Woman and that this is a God-given design conferred upon Men. They take their Man responsibilities very seriously. They choose a woman and form a family with the Man as the head (the ruler) of the family. By God’s design, the Man has specific responsibilities related to his family, to God, and to the community.

    Any threats to undermine this patriarchal view of life are recognized and opposed. Sexually active unmarried women are a threat, educated women unbound to a husband are a threat, gay persons are a threat, and some other social norms may be threats. These people know that the world is full of temptation and the less temptation available then the more likely their family unit will prosper and grow in accordance with the faith they have. They also know that if the other side strengthens, their belief system may be altered and that is a threat, too.

    Mixed into that belief are practical matters that conflict with beliefs. These are managed as best as possible by flawed human beings. The role that these patriarchal men have is to take care of their families and the community in which they live. They are in conflict regularly with those who want a different community, a community that does not live by the same faith these Men have.

    Supporting Contraception is not a ‘choice’ to these Men, although their wives and they may practice it, it is a challenge to their existence.

  4. February 17, 2012 4:56 PM

    Contraception is a personal choice… Politicians and all others not physically involved at the time of that choice, should sit down and shut up !

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