Pat Robertson Wrong About Wanting Marijuana Use To Be Legal


This is perplexing to me.

I am not in favor, nor have I ever been in favor of the legalization of marijuana, except for medical purposes.  Some cancer patients find marijuana useful with pain relief and increasing appetite.  Legalization of marijuana runs counter to what I think is in the best interest of the nation.  I totally understand I am in the minority when it comes to legalization of this drug.

I suspect it may almost seem alien to admit I have never once tried marijuana.  I also have never once tried a cigarette.  Hard to believe perhaps, but true.

My dad smoked cigarettes in my youth, and as a result I never wanted any part of them.  In my early teen years my dad stopped smoking, and the whole family continually applauded him for the effort at making his health, and our lives better.

I have never felt the need to escape via drugs, or to have some alternative reality to cling to as a means of coping.  As a teenager I loved to go biking into the country, and now long walks with James clears the mind and adds perspective.

While I am very aware that a long list of notables on all sides of the political spectrum have weighed in over time on why legalization of marijuana and other drugs is a rational approach our government should be taking, I have never been able to agree.

Old-fashioned perhaps, but that is just how I feel.

Getting to the root causes of why someone has bouts of anger, boredom, depression, anxiety, (reasons many turn to marijuana) would be a far more useful and productive use of time than to light a joint.  Life will be much richer in a wide variety of ways if the higher path can be found, as opposed to a haze of smoke.

So, yes, I am just perplexed by the words of Pat Robertson.  I have often differed with him on a wide range of issues, but I suspected we would agree on this one dealing with marijuana.

Robertson is a man who promotes spiritual values, and as such I am at a loss to explain how  admitting defeat over a proven problem that demonstrates itself in many ways  is good for either the individual, or the nation.  How does what Robertson says in any way lift our nation to something better?  If the ‘war on drugs’ is not working, then it needs to be modified.  Handing the sling-shot over to Goliath and bending down is not my view of leadership or morality.

“I really believe we should treat marijuana the way we treat beverage alcohol,” Mr. Robertson said in an interview on Wednesday. “I’ve never used marijuana and I don’t intend to, but it’s just one of those things that I think: this war on drugs just hasn’t succeeded.”       

Mr. Robertson’s remarks echoed statements he made last week on “The 700 Club,” the signature program of his Christian Broadcasting Network, and other comments he made in 2010. While those earlier remarks were largely dismissed by his followers, Mr. Robertson has now apparently fully embraced the idea of legalizing marijuana, arguing that it is a way to bring down soaring rates of incarceration and reduce the social and financial costs.       

“I believe in working with the hearts of people, and not locking them up,” he said.       

Mr. Robertson’s remarks were hailed by pro-legalization groups, who called them a potentially important endorsement in their efforts to roll back marijuana penalties and prohibitions, which residents of Colorado and Washington will vote on this fall.

11 thoughts on “Pat Robertson Wrong About Wanting Marijuana Use To Be Legal

  1. Just curious…do you think we should ban booze again?

    I’m also curious to know what “modifications” do you think should be enacted that would make the War on Drugs….especially the War on Tokers…..a success?

  2. Prohibition worked so well ….. Kinda like the MJ laws….

    Lets see, Make MJ legal like alcohol, collect tons of tax on it, and pay for all those
    birth control pills that the liberated women are clamoring for with that tax money instead of insurance. That’s a win, win, win…

    Pat was having a slow news day, threw out the bait, and …………….

  3. Skip

    “Getting to the root causes of why someone has bouts of anger, boredom, depression, anxiety, (reasons many turn to marijuana) would be a far more useful and productive use of time than to light a joint. Life will be much richer in a wide variety of ways if the higher path can be found, as opposed to a haze of smoke.”

    Many people smoke marijuana for fun. Plain and simple. Why don’t you just stay out of other people’s lives instead of imposing your own personal views on how to have a “rich” life, how to find the (ahem) “higher” path, etc.? Just because you get something out of going for walks doesn’t mean everyone else will.

    You don’t like it when people impose their views against gay marriage and against homosexuality on you, so how about staying out of the lives of those who like to smoke marijuana?

    Human beings have been altering their minds with drugs for thousands of years. That is how we are. How disappointing it is to read about your willingness to dictate how others should live their lives and your support of a racist and “drug war” that is costing billions of dollars and filling our jails while people continue to use drugs.

  4. Smokey,

    “Lets see, Make MJ legal like alcohol, collect tons of tax on it, and pay for all those
    birth control pills…”

    What is it conservatives that makes you all want to tax and spend, tax and spend…..!

  5. Alex

    You say, “getting to the root causes of why someone has bouts of anger, boredom, depression, anxiety, (reasons many turn to marijuana) would be a far more useful and productive use of time than to light a joint.”

    Then later you say, “If the ‘war on drugs’ is not working, then it needs to be modified.”

    Well, OK. Wouldn’t one way of “modifying” the “war on drugs” be to turn it into a public health issue rather than a law enforcement issue? Repealing and stopping enforcement of all marijuana laws would then free up a whole lot of resources which could then be diverted to mental health services.

    Furthermore, drug convictions in particular make it very difficult to qualify for financial aid or get a job. People’s entire lives are being ruined for something that they may have done at age 19 that hurt absolutely no one but themselves. You’re almost better off raping someone than getting caught selling marijuana–certainly that doesn’t make any sense, especially considering that in almost every way, marijuana is biologically less harmful than alcohol.

    I am also puzzled by your support for medical marijuana. Medical marijuana would quickly become a farce as people who really wanted to use marijuana would just engage in “doctor shopping,” regardless of the actual medical need. I suppose you could then suspend or revoke the licenses of doctors who prescribe marijuana unnecessarily, but that would also be incredibly counterproductive as we are already facing a shortage of doctors, and putting otherwise good doctors out of business would be simply unconscionable. It should be full legalization or nothing.

    Like you, I have never used tobacco or marijuana. I just think that keeping marijuana illegal is a profoundly dumb use of resources–resources that could be better used on helping all people have better access to mental and physical health care, and K-12 and postsecondary education.

  6. PP,

    One area I would like improvement in is the use of our foreign aid dollars—using them in a carrot and stick fashion to better curtail drugs from entering the U.S. I still see this as much of a supply problem as a demand one.

    As to tokers I would like to see an uptick in our approach to stopping the use of cig smoking. There is data to show that kids who start this habit when they are young are then more likely to become dependent on nicotine as their brains are still not fully developed, and the data is showing that from cigs to other addicting drugs becomes easier than for those same aged kids who do not smoke. So better educational material, and also just better over-all knowledge for parents and teachers, ministers, etc. Small steps to be sure, and there are huge numbers of far more engaged people than I who could add many more steps to what needs to be done—or at least tried.

  7. Gregory,
    Maybe we would rather tax and spend (Appropriately) than give a large portion of our hard earned income to the government to give to freeloaders. See that way, the people who benefit from smoking MJ (Especially the recreational smokers), or getting free birth control pills by dictate from a socialistic government , might contribute at least a little to their own “needs”… I know a whole bunch of folks that smoke MJ, and most of them would be glad to pay a small tax on their weed if that would end all the hysterical liberal ranting.. That’s a concept that liberals seem to have a problem understanding, but is easily understood by those of us who have worked for a living all our lives and paid our own way.

    I’m still trying to figure out why the Pope is sharing his infallibility with you…

    Purplepenquin.. No don’t ban alcohol, just end the silly war on drugs…. that was was lost before it started…

  8. Smokey,

    You seem to think–and made the point again here–that some how only conservatives work and pay taxes.

    Well, my friend, here is a news alert from liberal Madison to Alaska.

    Most of us liberals have worked for a living all our lives and paid our own way too.

    Make whatever points you wish to make, but do not get confused in thinking that somehow conservatives work harder or pay more. That just is not reality.

  9. Dekerivers, ” Legalization of marijuana runs counter to what I think is in the best interest of the nation. I totally understand I am in the minority when it comes to legalization of this drug.

    I suspect it may almost seem alien to admit I have never once tried marijuana. I also have never once tried a cigarette. Hard to believe perhaps, but true.”

    Same HERE AND WE AGREE 100 %. I’ll be dog gone!

    Craig skip Weis. Gee I never thought that would happen. ‘Smoking is for suckers’. I want that bumper sticker.

    It tells the world you as a smoker don’t give a darn about your habits or your body…that your a weak minded son of a gun…I made the decision never to smoke at age 4, I can remember the day clearly.

    As I deliver prescription drugs to Keta Steebs [ my favorite Democrat here in town ] who can not navigate to the front door without her walker, or shop at our pharmacy without being in a wheel chair, she willingly attributes her poor health to learning to smoke at a very young age…in fact Keta wrote a piece about smoking in ‘Keta’s Potluck’ printed in The Advocate newspaper. Good for you Dekerivers.

    Craig skip Weis

  10. Mary Jane

    I was also perplexed to see that Pat Robertson, of all people, endorsed full legalization.
    He brings up an excellent point, though, that we have a prison problem in this country and drug-related incarcerations are taking a toll. Many states have decriminalized marijuana, which makes the first few offenses the same as a parking ticket. This reduces the incarceration rate and keeps non-violent people in society where we need them.
    Many marijuana users are at home with a small amount. If it were treated like alcohol, then it would be okay for them to do so and there would be designated places for this behavior.
    It would be an offense to disturb the public or drive under the influence.
    The reality is that marijuana is widely popular and no political war will change people’s minds. Banning anything is opening the door for the black market to thrive. I would rather do business with the legal market where everything is regulated. That’s why prohibition didn’t work, it was all too easy to get around.
    It’s not for everyone and neither is alcohol. You speak of your smoking father in your post and I had an alcoholic mother. We are all raised differently and open minds lead to open hearts. The title of your blog, Caffeinated Politics, leads me to believe that you are a lover of caffeine, which is a also a drug. One of the worst ones actually, but it’s socially acceptable and not questioned.

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