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If You Are A Watergate History Buff (40 Years After The Break-In) This Is For You

June 9, 2012

“The press is your enemy,” Nixon explained five days later in a meeting with Adm. Thomas H. Moorer, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, according to another tape. “Enemies. Understand that? . . . Now, never act that way . . . give them a drink, you know, treat them nice, you just love it, you’re trying to be helpful. But don’t help the bastards. Ever. Because they’re trying to stick the knife right in our groin.”

It is amazing how the life and times of Richard Nixon, along with the Watergate crisis have so long enthralled me.  No other single person dominates more space on my book shelves than Nixon, and no other single event in our nation’s history has generated so much reading and probing on my part as Watergate.  From my years as a teenager watching Nixon resign, or in the past weeks enjoying Watergate, I am continually fascinated with this story.

As the 40th anniversary of the break-in nears, the famed reporters who led the journalistic investigation, Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, have written a powerful read about that chapter in our nation’s life, and conclude Richard Nixon was worse than we thought.

Today, much more than when we first covered this story as young Washington Post reporters, an abundant record provides unambiguous answers and evidence about Watergate and its meaning. This record has expanded continuously over the decades with the transcription of hundreds of hours of Nixon’s secret tapes, adding detail and context to the hearings in the Senate and House of Representatives; the trials and guilty pleas of some 40 Nixon aides and associates who went to jail; and the memoirs of Nixon and his deputies. Such documentation makes it possible to trace the president’s personal dominance over a massive campaign of political espionage, sabotage and other illegal activities against his real or perceived opponents.

In the course of his five-and-a-half-year presidency, beginning in 1969, Nixon launched and managed five successive and overlapping wars — against the anti-Vietnam War movement, the news media, the Democrats, the justice system and, finally, against history itself. All reflected a mind-set and a pattern of behavior that were uniquely and pervasively Nixon’s: a willingness to disregard the law for political advantage, and a quest for dirt and secrets about his opponents as an organizing principle of his presidency.

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