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Miles O’Brien, PBS Reporter, Formerly With CNN, Has Arm Amputated After Minor Injury

February 26, 2014

TV CNN Miles O'Brien

This is just one very strange story.  I think Miles O’Brien to be very smart.  When it came to reporting about space news on CNN he was one of the best in the field.  I am very sorry to hear this news, and can only hope that in some way this event in his life, though tragic, will power him onwards with more strong science reporting.

PBS science correspondent Miles O’Brien said Tuesday his left arm was amputated above the elbow after an apparently minor injury put his life in jeopardy.

In a blog post on his personal website Tuesday, which was verified by PBS, O’Brien recounted the Feb. 12 blow to his arm he suffered while on assignment in Asia and the medical emergency that followed.

He was diagnosed with “acute compartment syndrome,” O’Brien said, in which blocked blood flow in an enclosed space in the body can cause life-threatening consequences.

Part of his arm was removed in a choice between “a life and a limb,” O’Brien said, quoting his doctor. He is grateful to be alive, the PBS reporter said.

O’Brien has continued working despite the ordeal, PBS spokeswoman Anne Bell said.

The former CNN science and space correspondent covers science for “PBS NewsHour” and is a correspondent for public TV’s documentary series “Frontline” and the National Science Foundation’s Science Nation online magazine.

According to his blog, O’Brien was securing cases filled with camera gear on a cart as he wrapped up a reporting trip to Japan and the Philippines. One of the cases fell onto his left forearm, he wrote, adding, “It hurt, but I wasn’t all ‘911’ about it.”

The arm was sore and swollen the next day but worsened on the next, Feb. 14, and he sought medical care. O’Brien did not detail where he was and PBS couldn’t immediately provide the information.

At the hospital, as his pain increased and arm numbness set in, a doctor recommended an emergency procedure to relive the pressure within the limb, O’Brien wrote.

“When I lost blood pressure during the surgery due to the complications of compartment syndrome, the doctor made a real-time call and amputated my arm just above

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