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How Are Governor Scott Walker And Governor Chris Christie Alike?

February 27, 2014

Openness and transparency are something that people want from their elected officials.  Given the degree people are drawn to social media, and the frankness that so many of them express on almost every topic imaginable, it then seems odd to hear office-holders when caught in political scandal dodge and deflect questions that the public want answered.

Yet that continues to be the modus operandi when it comes to the two biggest legal dramas playing out among Republicans.

In New Jersey beleaguered Governor Chris Christie has let it be known that he is not “going to give into the hysteria” or “speculate on things I don’t know about”.  In others words he is no longer going to respond to the questions that need to be answered about not only the lane closings on the busiest bridge in the nation, but also on the tentacles of that story which reach into the very way his office operates.

Meanwhile back in the Midwest where politicians are to be more ‘one with the people’ than the brusque nature of New Jersey pols the same level of short-changing the inquiring minds of the citizery can be found.

Governor Scott Walker has taken the same approach as Christie, and stated he is not going to comment on the past actions of his office while serving as Milwaukee County Executive.  If Walker can not square with the public how his political operation ran counter to the law and ethics while in Milwaukee how are the voters to have any faith that his office in the statehouse operates any differently?    Until Walker honestly confronts the truth as shown by the documents from the John Doe probe how can citizens believe that he has learned any lessons going forward?

The questions will not go away for either governor.  They will be asked over and over until the issues are resolved with a frank and honest answer.

The longer until such answers are provided the more of a toll it takes on the political veneer each of these men have tried to cultivate.   They may not care about the right of the voters to know the truth, but in the end the truth will come out one way or another.  The only question then is how much credibility will Christie and Walker have remaining.  And what will it then be worth?

3 Comments
  1. mark sevelis permalink
    February 28, 2014 11:00 AM

    If you lefties have any proof then sue Walker in a court of law, otherwise, you are trying him in the false courts of innuendo and character assassination. There’s supposedly a third John “Dough” in the works. For maximum effect, start the investigation this summer just before the election.

    Remember, strike three and you are out. Everyone in Wisconsin already knows that your side is on a witch hunt.

  2. Solly permalink
    February 28, 2014 9:09 AM

    um, they both appoint unqualified political hacks and crooks. they both walk by close, top level staff everyday for years, who are doing illegal acts, and then employ the Sgt. Schutz defense, “I know nothing, NOTHING! (with Christie only needing the helmet to complete the look)

  3. tom permalink
    February 28, 2014 9:05 AM

    I think there are a lot of false assumptions here.

    1. “Openness and transparency are something that people want from their elected officials.” Yes but only from the other party’s officials. You don’t see many democrats asking questions about Fast and Furious, Bengazi, or the IRS.

    2. “seems odd to hear office-holders when caught in political scandal dodge and deflect questions that the public want answered.” Really? Seems rather common to me.

    3. “If Walker can not square with the public how his political operation ran counter to the law and ethics while in Milwaukee how are the voters to have any faith that his office in the statehouse operates any differently?” People have already made up their minds on this depending on party affiliation. We had two elections.

    4. “Until Walker honestly confronts the truth as shown by the documents from the John Doe probe how can citizens believe that he has learned any lessons going forward?” By this you mean you are certain he is guilty despite the efforts of the highly partisan DA and his pets, and that he must admit such and resign in shame.

    5. “The longer until such answers are provided the more of a toll it takes on the political veneer each of these men have tried to cultivate.” In other words, until Mary Burke can find something better, this is her whole campaign (see Tom Barrett).

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