A Hopeful And Inspiring Cover Of The New Yorker

When Donald Trump Is Not The Only Unhinged Person In The Oval Office

I was away from this blogging desk yesterday.  Even away for much of the day from news and any social media.  A relaxing day up north allowed me to miss–until I turned on the news late last night–what was simply one of the most dispiriting and depressing scenes from inside the Oval Office I have ever seen.

Imagine being one of the most powerful men on the planet knowing you can meet with anyone you want from across the broad array of topics.  It could be scientists, philosophers, inventors, explorers.  The most brilliant and creative minds of the 21st century would love to visit the White House.

But Donald Trump chose to spend the afternoon with Kayne West.

A truly troubled rap singer, Kanye West, turned an Oval Office meeting with Trump into a near psychotic rambling curse-laden meltdown.  There was no doubt that West has a serious medical condition.  His own admission to his bipolar issue is clearly not a made-up matter.   Even Trump, who is not smart, could see that West claiming to be just sleep-deprived was far from reality.

Trump was told by the rapper that he was made to feel manly with his leadership.  I have no words suited for a family-oriented blog site so will leave that statement from West to stand on its own.  He compared the red hats worn by Trump, and his followers, as akin to feeling power in the manner of a “superman cape”.

It has been clear for years that West did not have a family unit of the kind that produces healthy kids.  No one acts like he has over the years and not have a reason for why it all happens.  Perhaps that is why he melts with awkward affection for a male personality of the kind he never had in his own life.  But like the troubled men in West’s own family, and the one he married into, Trump is a mess of a man, himself, and should not be anyone’s role model.

But there West sat looking into the face of Trump saying, “you know, there’s not a lot of male energy. It’s beautiful though.”

Simply Wow.

With West pondering if he should seek the presidency–I simply am reporting the event–he added what was totally jaw-dropping, even by the standards of what had already been said.  West stated,  “Let’s stop worrying about the future. All we have is today.”.

Seems the future is always a matter for any president to be most concerned about.

Trump should have called in the White House physician and had West carted off.  But Trump was all aglow that he had a friend who would say nice things about him–even it was pure babble.

West really needs help.   But so does Trump.

And so it goes.

Matthew Shepard Will Be Interred At Washington National Cathedral

No way this story does not catch one in the throat–too sad and touching for anything more than just the facts.

For 20 years, the ashes of Matthew Shepard have not been laid to rest.

Mr. Shepard’s killing in 1998, when he was a 21-year-old college student, led to national outrage and, almost overnight, turned him into a symbol of deadly violence against gay people.

Mourners flocked to his funeral that year in Casper, Wyo., but there were also some protesters, carrying derogatory signs. Mr. Shepard’s parents worried that if they chose a final resting place for their son, it would be at risk of desecration.

Now they have found a safe place. On Oct. 26, Mr. Shepard will be interred at the Washington National Cathedral, the neo-Gothic, Episcopal house of worship that is a fixture of American politics and religion.

“I think it’s the perfect, appropriate place,” Dennis Shepard, Matthew’s father, said in an interview on Thursday. “We are, as a family, happy and relieved that we now have a final home for Matthew, a place that he himself would love.”

Two decades ago, Matthew Shepard was robbed by two men, pistol-whipped and tied to a fence in Laramie. He hung there bleeding in near-freezing temperatures until a passing bicyclist spotted him, thinking at first that he was a scarecrow. He later died in a hospital.

“His death was a wound on our nation,” Mariann Edgar Budde, the bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington, said in an interview on Wednesday. “We are doing our part to bring light out of that darkness and healing to those who have been so often hurt, and sometimes hurt in the name of the church.”

The elder Mr. Shepard said his family had long searched for a fitting resting place for his son, who was once an altar boy in the Episcopal Church. They considered spreading his ashes over the mountains and plains of Wyoming, but still wanted a place they could visit to talk to him. They considered splitting the ashes.

At the cathedral, not only will the family be able to visit him, but so will guests from across the world. 

Two decades ago, Matthew Shepard was robbed by two men, pistol-whipped and tied to a fence in Laramie. He hung there bleeding in near-freezing temperatures until a passing bicyclist spotted him, thinking at first that he was a scarecrow. He later died in a hospital.

“His death was a wound on our nation,” Mariann Edgar Budde, the bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington, said in an interview on Wednesday. “We are doing our part to bring light out of that darkness and healing to those who have been so often hurt, and sometimes hurt in the name of the church.”

The elder Mr. Shepard said his family had long searched for a fitting resting place for his son, who was once an altar boy in the Episcopal Church. They considered spreading his ashes over the mountains and plains of Wyoming, but still wanted a place they could visit to talk to him. They considered splitting the ashes.

At the cathedral, not only will the family be able to visit him, but so will guests from across the world

“It’s a place where there’s an actual chance for others to sit and reflect about Matthew, and about themselves, and about their friends,” Mr. Shepard’s father said.