How Do Religious Conservatives Square It With God When A Praying Man Is Maligned?

At the end of the day, there is only one question to ask after Fox News is turned off, Rush Limbaugh is silenced, and the calm of night falls over the homes of American Christians who support Donald Trump.  Just how do they square their day with God?

I ask the question not in a snarky way, or one that is aimed for raw-meat politics.  I am most sincere in my desire to understand the ability of people who compartmentalize their support of Trump, a person sitting in the Oval Office who continuously demonstrates his disdain for the lessons of the Bible.  Those Trump supporters then tout themselves as Christians.

While we all fall short of the ideals–that being the human condition–there is an enormous chasm between the lies, boastful nature, meanness, and divisiveness that Trump contains as a man and then the call of faith which encourages us to model our lives on loftier sights.

This week comes another glaring example of what I am talking about with Trump, and there is no doubt a great many Christians will just grin, nod, and agree with the one they have sided with.

A new Trump campaign ad released on Wednesday contains a number of altered or edited images of former vice president Joe Biden.  News reporters from The Washington Post, CNN, and other news outlets have called out the distortions and lies.  I would hope some of the Christian base would do the same.

The most despicable part of the ad is an altered image of Biden praying at church.  The aim of the photo was to make him appear as old and defeated when in reality it is Biden praying on June 1st at the Bethel AME church.  The photo was taken by an AP photographer.

biden-praying-4

Trump’s ad is an affront to religious people and I find it personally offensive.  I could venture here into how its use underscores the desperation of his campaign. But the point of this post is not to take that path.  I am just taken aback how anyone who claims life of faith can sit still and accept what Trump is doing for the single selfish purpose of his re-election.

In the opening pages of my book, Walking Up The Ramp I wrote the following.  I would hope and trust that at least some Trump supporters might ponder the words and reflect on what they are doing in being silent as Trump undermines even the personal space of a praying man.

Out on our lawn, sitting in one of those three New England-blue Adirondack chairs, I often repeat to myself a silent prayer, the same prayer with which upon waking I start out each day:

Dear God, thank you for this day.
Thank you for my life;
Thank you for letting me be alive;
Thank you for letting me live life.
Walk with me today and plant my feet
In the path you would have me take.
Let me be a light for others.

I often write of the new basements we hit as a nation on the slippery slope our society too often embraces.  But this one is all the more troubling as the ones who sit in the pews and make the most of their religion are the ones who will stay silent when a praying man is used in such a disgusting partisan manner.

And so it goes.

Legendary Journalist Dies: Pete Hamill Was 85

B3-CX299_HAMILL_P_20190116105536

The iconic writer has now put his pen and pad down.

At a time when too many people write only texts and get bored with more than a few paragraphs of words, we need to be reminded of the ones like Pete Hamill who prove what can be done with solid sentences and why there are treasures galore inside the pages of both newspapers and books.

Legendary journalist and writer Pete Hamill dead at 85 after fall,” by the New York Daily News’ Larry McShane: “Pete Hamill, the Brooklyn-born bard of the five boroughs and eloquent voice of his beloved hometown as both newspaper columnist and best-selling author, died Wednesday morning. He was 85.

The legendary Hamill worked for three city tabloidsserving as editor for both the Daily News and the New York Post during a newspaper career that covered the last 40 years of the 20th century. … The lifelong New Yorker brought a touch of poetry to the tabloids, a sense of grace, wit and empathy amid the daily dose of crime and corruption. The author of more than 20 novels and more than 100 short stories also wrote long pieces on various subjects for The New Yorker, Esquire, Rolling Stone and New York magazine.

Hamill continued writing fiction into the new millennium, with “Tabloid City: A Novel” published in May 2011 and a collection titled “The Christmas Kid: And Other Brooklyn Stories” released a year later. He was working on another book titled “Back to the Old Country,” a reminiscence about the role his native Brooklyn played in his life, at the time of his death.

“Pete Hamill told New York’s story for 60 years,” tweeted Jim Dwyer, another former Daily News columnist now at the Times. “His voice rang loudest & truest when the city was in trouble in the 1970s, like the patriots in Casablanca drowning out the Nazis with La Marseillaise. The goodness of his generous heart never ran low. Thanks for all of it. RIP.”

Hamill’s 1960s contemporaries included some of the best writers of his or any generation: Fellow “New Journalism” acolytes Tom Wolfe, Jimmy Breslin, Gay Talese and Norman Mailer. He and Breslin were highlighted last year in the acclaimed HBO documentary “Deadline Artists.”

Hamill recounted writing a heartfelt letter that convinced RFK to run for president. When the shooting started in Los Angeles on June 5, 1968, he helped disarm killer Sirhan Sirhan as the mortally wounded Kennedy lay nearby.

“My notes told me later that Kennedy was shot at 12:10, and was carried out of that grubby kitchen at 12:32,” he wrote 40 years later. “It seemed a lot longer.”

He went south to cover Martin Luther King, and stayed home for the last interview with fellow New Yorker John Lennon. He reported on “The Troubles” in his ancestral homeland, and covered wars in Vietnam, Nicaragua and Lebanon.

At a time when too many people write only texts and get bored with more than a few paragraphs of words, we need to be reminded of the ones like Pete Hamill who prove what can be done with solid sentences and why there are treasures galore inside the pages of both newspapers and books.

Legendary journalist and writer Pete Hamill dead at 85 after fall,” by the New York Daily News’ Larry McShane: “Pete Hamill, the Brooklyn-born bard of the five boroughs and eloquent voice of his beloved hometown as both newspaper columnist and best-selling author, died Wednesday morning. He was 85.

The legendary Hamill worked for three city tabloidsserving as editor for both the Daily News and the New York Post during a newspaper career that covered the last 40 years of the 20th century. … The lifelong New Yorker brought a touch of poetry to the tabloids, a sense of grace, wit and empathy amid the daily dose of crime and corruption. The author of more than 20 novels and more than 100 short stories also wrote long pieces on various subjects for The New Yorker, Esquire, Rolling Stone and New York magazine.

Hamill continued writing fiction into the new millennium, with “Tabloid City: A Novel” published in May 2011 and a collection titled “The Christmas Kid: And Other Brooklyn Stories” released a year later. He was working on another book titled “Back to the Old Country,” a reminiscence about the role his native Brooklyn played in his life, at the time of his death.

“Pete Hamill told New York’s story for 60 years,” tweeted Jim Dwyer, another former Daily News columnist now at the Times. “His voice rang loudest & truest when the city was in trouble in the 1970s, like the patriots in Casablanca drowning out the Nazis with La Marseillaise. The goodness of his generous heart never ran low. Thanks for all of it. RIP.”

Hamill’s 1960s contemporaries included some of the best writers of his or any generation: Fellow “New Journalism” acolytes Tom Wolfe, Jimmy Breslin, Gay Talese and Norman Mailer. He and Breslin were highlighted last year in the acclaimed HBO documentary “Deadline Artists.”

Hamill recounted writing a heartfelt letter that convinced RFK to run for president. When the shooting started in Los Angeles on June 5, 1968, he helped disarm killer Sirhan Sirhan as the mortally wounded Kennedy lay nearby.

“My notes told me later that Kennedy was shot at 12:10, and was carried out of that grubby kitchen at 12:32,” he wrote 40 years later. “It seemed a lot longer.”

He went south to cover Martin Luther King, and stayed home for the last interview with fellow New Yorker John Lennon. He reported on “The Troubles” in his ancestral homeland, and covered wars in Vietnam, Nicaragua and Lebanon.

NZTATORMLRFEFJ6NF2NXFKLBAM