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Kim Davis, Kentucky Homophobe, Fails At Supreme Court

October 5, 2020

We all recall the person in Rowan County, Kentucky who thought her religion was of more importance than her government job. More important, in fact, than the rulings from the Supreme Court. Kim Davis’ defiance of a court order to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples was just plain awful—it was homophobia on full display.

The court today turned aside a case from Davis who sued after she said her religious convictions kept her from recognizing same-sex marriages, even after the Supreme Court found a constitutional right to those unions.

Davis continues to be a joke and we would still be laughing if what she did was not so pathetic. Not only did she made a spectacle of herself but also allowed for the all too-true caricatures many have of people in that region of the country to again be brought to attention.

Davis had four marriages to three different men in 21 years , which seems an odd background to have when it comes to making statements about the sanctity of marriage. One does have to ask how desperate men in Kentucky are in light of the facts. Davis has said she got involved with religion to fulfill the dying wish of her mother-in-law. She fails to mention which one of those mothers-in-law it happened to be.

This blog has long posted about Davis and her lifestyle!

Davis gave birth to twins five months after divorcing her first husband. They were fathered by her third husband, but adopted by her second.

Are you following?

Let’s break that down real quick: Basically, Kim cheated on her first Husband #1 with her Future Husband #3, got pregnant by #3, divorced #1, then married Husband #2, who adopted #3’s twins.

All that is missing is to find out one of her husbands is her brother!  Ye-Haw!

Today the court correctly told Davis no more antics will be allowed in their chamber.

The Supreme Court on Monday said it will not hear a case from a Kentucky clerk who refused to issue marriage licenses for same-sex couples, but two conservative dissenters in the court’s landmark 2015 decision repeated their criticism of the ‘ruinous consequences for religious liberty.’

The court turned aside a case from Kim Davis, the former county clerk who was sued after she said her religious convictions kept her from recognizing same-sex marriages, even after the Supreme Court found a constitutional right to those unions in Obergefell v. Hodges. She was briefly jailed over the matter, and her case had attracted national attention. Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel A. Alito Jr. said they agreed with the court’s decision not to hear Davis’s petition, but used the occasion to renew their objections.

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