Doty Land Podcast: Memories Of Trans American School Of Broadcasting, 41 Years Later

With fondness and laughter Bruce Miller, George Manesis, and Gregory Humphrey trek back 41 years to reminisce about the Wausau, Wisconsin broadcasting school.  From how these young men saw themselves at the time, to how radio impacts their lives today, this podcast episode surely mirrors the hundreds of graduates over the years.  From the school owner, Ray Szmanda, to the iconic Scott Street Pub these three guys regale memories that will transport all those who once harbored ‘radio fever’ to a place of youthful nostalgia.  An episode that has a professional touch,  a human connection. Darius Rucker, The Knack, and Connie Smith add the melody.

George Manesis, Bruce Miller, Gregory Humphrey seated.
Gregory, Bruce, and George coming up to the third-floor studio.

My New Doty Land Podcast: Elvis, Thunderstorms, Dan Rather, And Local Radio

Fond memories of Gregory Humphrey’s first day on WDOR radio with Elvis’ music, recollections of Dan Rather one Sunday morning on a Texas radio station, and a severe thunderstorm in Sturgeon Bay when a Brewer baseball game is knocked off the air as callers light up the phone lines!  Funny memories with another Doty Land professional-sounding podcast.

Doty Land is not the biggest or the best podcast, but it is mine and it makes for lots of smiles and hours well-spent on the Madison isthmus.

Doty Land Podcast: Dane County Alzheimer’s Episode Gains Traction

Doty Land is not the biggest or the best podcast, but it is mine and it makes for lots of smiles and hours well-spent on the Madison isthmus.

Radio and broadcasting was my first love as a boy, working at WDOR was a thrill for years, and my home studio for podcasting now is the perfect niche.

I am super pleased with how my Alzheimers episode has landed with listeners, which is what is reflected in the downloads. I used contemporaneous notes from the time and recorded the episode in under 30 minutes. Adding the bumpers and editing and the project was completed in a couple hours.

Stories of laughter and also tenderness deals with the final chapter of the life of Albert Trull. It makes for a somber podcast. But one that is aimed to reach out and ask what role all can play with the elderly people needing friendship and companionship within our communities.

I find the tone of what I hope to achieve on my podcast episodes mirrors what I heard coming over the radio airwaves while growing up in Hancock. Respect your audience, be professional, and have fun, too. Check, check, and check.

And so it goes.

Our ‘Anything Goes’ Society When It Comes to Podcasting

I reject the long-time undermining of standards in our nation. From the way people dress without care regarding how they look (well, it was his good T-shirt for the funeral home visitation), or the often-boorish language that is usually shouted loudly for added impact inside a mall. Everywhere one looks there are fewer guardrails being employed for how people act in society.

I read today on a Facebook page for podcasters the following about a Joe Rogan episode. A listener took the time to hear the long episode, and upon finishing offered the following comment.

I heard countless plosives, breaths, and bangs on the table… even a glass being knocked over at one point. Long pauses between thoughts… so much so that I checked my phone to see if something went wrong. Studders, stammers, and even talking over each other at points. So many things that we often view as faux pas and no-no’s,….

That is how Rogan, a ‘successful podcaster’ presented himself to his audience. Now, I could challenge the conversation Rogan recorded or the ‘facts’ he tossed to his listeners. But my post here is about something larger than all that.

I have a far different perspective on what an audience should expect from podcasters. Perhaps old school, even. And as such, I offered the following as a reply on the page this evening.

First and foremost, always respect your audience. We are basically asking folks to allow us into their homes, cars, or ear pods via a podcast. Our behavior and demeanor ‘on air’ should echo how we would act if in person, or how we would want others to be acting if knocking on our door to have entrance. Being abrasive for impact—not that most podcasters desire that—should not be the goal.

We would wish for our best delivery if face-to-face, so when recording a podcast aim for breath control, do not play with water glasses, and stem cursing, if that is an issue. I would suggest that while ‘anything goes’ seems to be a way to podcast, is that really how you want others to hear you? Perceive you?

For instance, it can be very effective in conversation to have a pause but to have a span where a listener checks the connection is not what most would wish their podcast to sound like. Again, our podcasts reflect on the person behind the microphone.

Next, the pacing of delivery is something that does not get mentioned much, but it matters. Most people in our nation speak at about 160 words per minute. Just as an aside, and a weird trivia point here, but Walter Cronkite trained himself to speak only 124 words per minute as he felt that pace allowed for understanding whatever was being imparted to the listener.

Finally, try placing a photo of your parents or some person you really respect in your podcasting area and talk to that person as you work behind the microphone. How would you make your episode sound if that person pictured was the one to hear the final product?

Having higher standards does not mean perfection will result, but it will ensure quality control for what we love to do.

For my blog readers, I should state I do not take time out for each instance where ‘anything goes’ raises its head. But broadcasting, and its cousin podcasting, do merit some response when the lessening of respect to listeners and just sloppy production values are deemed to be acceptable.

No.

No.

And so it goes.

The Long Goodbye, Doty Land Alzheimer’s Disease Podcast

Another Doty Land Podcast from the Madison isthmus is ‘on the air’. I worked on this project in my broadcast studio Thursday night as the temperatures sank lower and lower.

With contemporaneous accounts of smiles and trying times while dealing with a friend’s Alzheimer’s disease come stories of laughter and also tenderness.  The final chapter of the life of Albert Trull, and the way it weaved with the personal life of podcaster Gregory Humphrey as his father was dying, makes for a somber podcast.  But one that is aimed to reach out and ask what role all can play with the elderly people needing friendship and companionship within our communities. 

New Doty Land Podcast: Compassion On The Battlefield

This is my second podcast this week!

When a German soldier in WWII acts with compassion to save the lives of Americans what does that tell us about humanity?  Those types of acts of compassion on the battlefield are explored in an upcoming documentary.  Stephanie Manesis, director and producer of the film talks not only about the multi-year project but also how creativity has manifested itself in her life.  Podcaster Gregory Humphrey notes it is a joy to have such a great conversationalist to interview. 

The podcaster at work.
My happy spot.

New Doty Land Podcast: “Sure Does Feel Stormy Today”

Podcaster Gregory Humphrey goes back to childhood days in Hancock, Wisconsin to prove weather of all sorts should be viewed up close.  Nothing is better than grandma’s arm around a shoulder as the thunder crashes or as a boy walking into the bracing winds of a winter snowstorm.  Nostalgic warm memories for anyone wishing to trek back in time. (7 minutes)

Memories Of Trans American School Of Broadcasting Doty Land

With fondness and laughter Bruce Miller, George Manesis, and Gregory Humphrey trek back 41 years to reminisce about the Wausau, Wisconsin broadcasting school.  From how these young men saw themselves at the time, to how radio impacts their lives today, this podcast episode surely mirrors the hundreds of graduates over the years.  From the school owner, Ray Szmanda, to the iconic Scott Street Pub these three guys regale memories that will transport all those who once harbored 'radio fever' to a place of youthful nostalgia.  An episode that has a professional touch,  a human connection.
  1. Memories Of Trans American School Of Broadcasting
  2. Elvis, Thunderstorms, Dan Rather, And Local Radio
  3. Sparking Moments Of Joy And Remembrance During The Long Goodbye
  4. Acting With Humanity In Time Of War Makes For New Film
  5. "Sure Does Feel Stormy Today"

You can hear Doty Land and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, iHeartradio, Spotify, Castro, and many other sites.

My New Doty Land Podcast: Tribute To Grant Turner, Classic Country Music Stars

Doty Land, my podcast, following a long hiatus due to truly swear-worthy technical issues and the pandemic which made it most difficult to have the equipment in our home worked on, is now back ‘on the air.’

Humbly written here, but I am mighty pleased with the 16-minute multi-track production which offers my sincere tribute to WSM radio announcer Grant Turner. I also offer my thoughts as to what essential quality the classic country singers had which then allowed for them to have such faithful fans many decades later.

You can hear Doty Land and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, iHeartradio, Spotify, Castro, and many other sites. Pandora and Amazon are the next sites I am working with that will be offering my podcast for your listening enjoyment.

You can also link here and head directly to my podcast page.

From memories of Loretta Lynn,  Porter Wagoner, Dolly Parton, WSM radio announcer Grant Turner and others this tribute looks at how classic country music still resonates across the land.  Heartfelt memories galore! Podcaster Gregory Humphrey takes listeners on a journey from his Hancock home to the stages of country music shows.  The fiddles are warming up, now.  

This project will not put me on the map, but it made me very happy if for no other reason than everything is working as the manufacturer of the studio equipment intended! Broadcasting and now its offshoots remains a great love of my life. Therefore, it was most rewarding to ramp up the production values for this episode. I admit to a few ‘bumps’ that perhaps my ear is more accustomed to discerning, but overall I am very content to offer this episode to the listening public.

Grandma Schwarz landed at this angle for the promo pic. As in radio days, I like to have photos of special people around as it makes for a more genuine type of conversation when recording. She seemed the one who would best connect with the topic of these recordings.

And so it goes.