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Time To Hold President Obama Accountable On Gay Rights

June 16, 2009

First let me say I was wrong.

Over the past six months I have felt that with the many domestic and international concerns facing the Obama White House that there needed to be a little time given for the new team in Washington to make progress on the list of pressing concerns facing gay Americans.  As such, I felt it necessary to give President Obama the benefit of the doubt that he would do the right thing.  Part of my logic was that the headline eruptions over DOMA or DADT would undermine his other hopes on health care, and the needs of the economy and foreign policy.   But the drip, drip, drip of truly troubling news from various points in his administration concerning gay rights makes it time to turn the heat on.

I admit I was lured into silence over these months by what I thought to be a higher mission Obama would take on issues of equality.  I understand the President is under the same rigors and tugs of the political machine as others who held his office.  I still think him extremely bright, well-intentioned, and am darn proud he is my President.  But I also know he needs to feel the political heat from those who want the same rights as all others in the nation.

There was never a good time for some politicians in the 1850’s to get tough on the evil of slavery in the nation.  We know that was wrong.  There now seems to be a timidity among some politicians to face the need for extending equal rights to gay citizens in 2009.  That is equally wrong.

That must end.

The honeymoon is over.

3 Comments
  1. monika permalink
    June 23, 2009 8:14 AM

    here here reasonablecitizen

  2. June 16, 2009 8:55 PM

    Obama is ahead of me. Go HERE.

  3. June 16, 2009 8:02 PM

    I do not think that gay rights is equivalent to slavery and I would gently ask that you reconsider that comparison. Gays are not bought and sold as property. There are no laws that would capture escaped gays and return them to their owners.

    I do not care about the private lives of others. I do not want a homosexual agenda for societal acceptance. I do think that People should receive equal benefits under the law regardless. Governments should not make a distinction between a man-woman relationship or a man-man/woman-woman relationship.

    Yet, common people are not governments and they are free to discriminate and express their displeasure with lifestyles that are contrary to their own beliefs. America is about freedom to live one’s life regardless of age, sex, race, and religion. However, it does not mean that a person must willingly accept without comment those views or beliefs or practices that are contrary to their own. There is another freedom in America that is not discussed. It is the freedom to dissent and to object to others forcing themselves upon you, your family, and your beliefs.
    Proselytizing one’s homosexuality is as obnoxious as proselytizing Christianity, democracy, and Republican Party/ Democratic Party views.But it is not illegal and should not be made so.

    I would not want to live in a country in which pastors at churches are forced to marry people against the church’s beliefs. I would not want to live in a country that denies people equal rights under the law. In between, however, lies societal acceptance and people have the right to choose how they act and react to others.

    This is my long-winded reply to say that if the President of the United States focuses on the rights of gays to marry, he is doing the wrong job. If he is focused on equal rights under the law, I can support that and if it takes him two years or seven years to address it, I can accept that, too. But having said that, I think that ‘married gay’ rights is a state issue and not a federal one. You can take Obama to task for not addressing gay rights within the Federal government but not for changing laws in Utah or Texas or changing benefit policies in GE or Microsoft.

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